Fun with the Air Fryer

I got an Air Fryer recently and have been playing with it. It’s called an Air Fryer because people love fried food and the idea of “frying” with little to no oil really sells these gadgets. Really, it’s like a mini convection oven, so it’s good at making things crispy.

Here’s what I have tried so far:

  1. Potato chunks
  2. Spinach
  3. Cauliflower

All three of these were done up simple. A splash of olive oil (or in the case the the spinach, a bit of oil spray) and some salt and maybe one or two other seasonings. I would have photos but they disappeared too fast. The spinach, I’m not kidding, was inside me and my kid in minutes.

These things were good, especially the spinach (if you like crispy kale you should try it for sure).

But tonight I took it to a whole new level and made the Buffalo Cauliflower Things from Ready or Not! the newest Nom Nom Paleo cook book. This is basically crisp-ish roasted cauliflower with Buffalo hot sauce. Sublime.

Have you made anything with an Air Fryer? Have a favorite recipe to share?

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30 Days of New Foods: Day 27: Keripik Tempe Pedas

Is that oatmeal in there? No.

I recently visited an Indonesian Grocery store and encountered a number of new foods. I wanted to try some Indonesian snacks so when I visit Java next month there’s a touch of the familiar.

So what is Keripik Tempe Pedas? “Spicy Soy Bean.” The ingredients: soy bean, salt, black pepper, palm oil, sugar, water and flavour enhancer (probably a code word for MSG).

It is crispy, spicy little oil bomb. I couldn’t eat very much in one sitting. I have to wonder how it tastes in 90 degree humid equatorial weather? In cold Seattle, it’s like having a mini-sun explode in your mouth. Like this sunset:

30 Days of New Foods: Day 26: Yuba Noodle

Yuba Noodle is a delicacy, apparently, made from the “skin” that forms on heated soymilk. It comes clumped together and when you cut it up (here I made strips about 3/4″ wide each), the layers tend to separate into something sort of like a noodle. Like tofu it is pretty flavorless until you add some kind of seasoning. I cooked mine with Tamari and some other stuff, using a meal kit from Munchery.

Here is the package:

Helping a Friend Through a Disaster

Hurricanes are weird. They can predict their coming days in advance, so you have plenty of time to prepare, and plenty of time to worry.

I don’t live in a Hurricane zone, but my best friend Monika does. She and her family were right in the predicted path of Hurricane Irma and it sure looked like they were going to be in deep trouble.

This post is about the lifeline I helped provide to Monika while she prepared and lived through the most dangerously threatening hurricane Florida has seen in a long, long time. She asked me to write this to help other people understand just how vital their remote assistance can be in times of impending disaster.

When Monika first called me crying saying she had a Cat 4 hurricane headed her way and their house was only rated for Cat 3 winds or lower, my first impulse was to try to deny this was really happening. I had already agreed to be her out of area contact and felt a sense of responsibility I wasn’t sure I was ready for. Over the next day or so, she sent me photos of her kids’ clothes with both hers and my number written on the inside of them. Visions of her children getting whisked away in a tornado and me being called to help identify the bodies were disturbing to say the least. We talked about her will, and her legacy to her children should she not make it through the storm. These are the sort of moments you don’t want to have to think about, until you realize that you must.

Imagine for a moment that your death could be imminent, but that your chance of survival could be much higher if you take the right precautions.  You need to focus on taking those precautions, and let someone else worry about the other stuff. My job was to deal with the other stuff. So while Moka was freezing ice in bags, prepping food, talking to neighbors about securing their house, I was in touch with her family letting them know what was up, and checking the news and weather frequently, sending her brief missives about what she needed to know from local news. She had no time to sit on the computer and try to figure out the track of the storm, the wind strength, whether or not the shelters in her county were full or if her neighbors had power. I could provide that info and did.

The best moments might have been when, late Sunday night, she was texting and asking me where the eye of the storm was. I had probably six different sites open but was having trouble finding the eye. It was as if a miracle had happened: the storm was beginning to break up, and the eye was dissipating, right as it got to them. From my look at the radar, I could tell her that the eerie calm she was hearing outside was not actually the eye, it was pretty much the end of the storm.

Fast forward to the happy ending…they got through it alright…two trees fell on their neighbor’s house and around the corner, four trees fell on another house and punctured the roof, leaving a gaping hole in the baby’s room.

So next time you have a faraway friend in a danger zone, see if you can reach out and help. It might just make a bigger difference than you can imagine.

 

30 Days of New Foods: Day 25

I found this in the freezer section of this huge Asian Market on Highway 99 and decided to try it. The package says to defrost it overnight in the fridge and then boil for 25 minutes until the center reaches an internal temperature of 165 Degrees F. I did that and this is what it looked like when I brought it out of the pot:

Here’s what it looks like when you get one out of the leaf wrapper:

The brown stuff is bean paste. I have a cold at the moment so I know I wasn’t getting the full flavor effect. It is slightly sweet and not bad.

I went to Central Park and out came this silly review

It was a hot August day and three of us Pacific Northwesterners unused to hot, humid weather wandered into the south end of Central Park with the naive bravado of Seattleites taking a walk at Green Lake. (For those unfamiliar, Green Lake is a large round puddle in the middle of N. Seattle with a simple path around it…forty five minutes walk and you are back to where you started).

We first fended off the guy who wanted us to pay at least $80 for some kind of bicycle rickshaw tour, then continued, still bright in the eyes, toward some giant rocks that begged to be climbed. By the time we got to the top of the first rock, this middle-aged mama was ready for a long sit. Took some ill-conceived vertical panorama shots of my husband that made him look fat, then spied a small rock in the distance and felt sorry for it, sitting by itself. We climbed a hill to hug the small rock, which turned out to be the height of a ten year old.

About thirty minutes after entering the park, heat-soaked delirium began to set in, along with big-time confusion about where to find a bathroom. We began to wander along paths that followed the whims of nature, rather than the friendly grid system of the urban locations to which we are accustomed. We came around a bend and a freaking amusement park appeared out of nowhere. I consulted the Google maps, even Pokemon GO, but could not figured out where I was. Yelp informed me that there was a coffee shop nearby by…Dancing Crane or some such. I was willing to believe anything at that point. Suddenly there it was…a coffee shop with A/C and a bathroom with a long line, next to the largest mayonnaise dispenser I’ve ever seen. Outside the shop was a Zoo, yes, a Zoo!

Next thing we knew, we were back at the south end of the park again, quite accidentally. Husband tried to convince me we were in the exact same location, but the truth was more insidious: the whole south end of the park is a series of carbon copy rubber stamps of everything else…the same identical looking food carts and guys selling overpriced tours, stamped up and down the concourse. I stayed on the “Wein Walk” while husband and daughter went to another iteration of endless hot dog carts. I saw a giant rat run across the walk. Wanting to get a closer look I went over to an empty park bench, hoping to sit my delirious, overheated body down, but a mom and her two boys beat me to the bench. I considered for a moment telling them about the rat hoping it would scare them off, but I wasn’t sure I could craft a coherent sentence.

We continued down the path and saw a building called Arsenal Gallery. Entering the building, we found yet another set of bathrooms and on the third floor they told us there was a gallery. The elevator let out, and we wandered around trying to find the cases of firearms we expected, then realized the gallery was actually showing paintings of plants, and had nothing to do with guns.

Our confused wander continued northward, where I procured a frozen lemonade and saw a reservoir full of remote control sailboats. Additional wonders included a black squirrel, which I didn’t even know existed. It occurred to me that many Central Park rodents probably lived and died for generations without ever leaving the park. Where else are they going to go?

[Originally posted on Yelp]