Well THAT didn’t work

They always say you can keep herbs fresh by putting them in a glass of water in the refrigerator. So I decided to try that with some green onions.

As you can see it didn’t really work. This is just one day. Wilted!


Fun with the Air Fryer

I got an Air Fryer recently and have been playing with it. It’s called an Air Fryer because people love fried food and the idea of “frying” with little to no oil really sells these gadgets. Really, it’s like a mini convection oven, so it’s good at making things crispy.

Here’s what I have tried so far:

  1. Potato chunks
  2. Spinach
  3. Cauliflower

All three of these were done up simple. A splash of olive oil (or in the case the the spinach, a bit of oil spray) and some salt and maybe one or two other seasonings. I would have photos but they disappeared too fast. The spinach, I’m not kidding, was inside me and my kid in minutes.

These things were good, especially the spinach (if you like crispy kale you should try it for sure).

But tonight I took it to a whole new level and made the Buffalo Cauliflower Things from Ready or Not! the newest Nom Nom Paleo cook book. This is basically crisp-ish roasted cauliflower with Buffalo hot sauce. Sublime.

Have you made anything with an Air Fryer? Have a favorite recipe to share?

30 Days of New Foods: Day 27: Keripik Tempe Pedas

Is that oatmeal in there? No.

I recently visited an Indonesian Grocery store and encountered a number of new foods. I wanted to try some Indonesian snacks so when I visit Java next month there’s a touch of the familiar.

So what is Keripik Tempe Pedas? “Spicy Soy Bean.” The ingredients: soy bean, salt, black pepper, palm oil, sugar, water and flavour enhancer (probably a code word for MSG).

It is crispy, spicy little oil bomb. I couldn’t eat very much in one sitting. I have to wonder how it tastes in 90 degree humid equatorial weather? In cold Seattle, it’s like having a mini-sun explode in your mouth. Like this sunset:

30 Days of New Foods: Day 26: Yuba Noodle

Yuba Noodle is a delicacy, apparently, made from the “skin” that forms on heated soymilk. It comes clumped together and when you cut it up (here I made strips about 3/4″ wide each), the layers tend to separate into something sort of like a noodle. Like tofu it is pretty flavorless until you add some kind of seasoning. I cooked mine with Tamari and some other stuff, using a meal kit from Munchery.

Here is the package:

Freakin’ Chaos in the Kitchen

I know some people like to keep their cabinets neat, their dishes and foods sorted and stacked neatly. I would do that too except that I don’t have enough room, and have learned to enjoy the chaos not knowing whether things will fall out on floor me when I open a door. I think it’s good to be prepared for the unexpected in life: messy cabinets are good training for that.

30 Days of New Foods: Day 21: Sweeten Radish

It’s probably supposed to be “sweetened radish” but just roll with it. I was introduced to this one via a shared recipe for Pad Thai, and actually managed to find this product at Central Market. It’s chock full of scary ingredients like food coloring and preservatives, but I chose to ignore that. Even cooked, this tastes kind of rubbery. It was decent in pad thai, but I’m not sure I can come up with another use for it. You?

NaPoWriMo 2017, poem 1

Energy bars

are disgusting.

Why don’t we just come out

and admit it?

Is the need for convenience

so great

that we accept some

sticky, pasty, bittersweet slab of face-scrunching

food-like substance

in place of real food?

It’s not just energy-promising foul cake-bricks:

Easy Cheese, Velveeta, Moon Cheese

are part of this sick game.

The price we pay for “cheese”

that doesn’t need refrigeration

is a loss of true flavor

like when we try to preserve

ourselves for long life

by forgetting

how to really live.